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File #: 19-934    Version: 1 Name:
Type: Consent Calendar Status: Agenda Ready
File created: 9/24/2019 In control: Council and Authorities Concurrent Meeting
On agenda: 12/3/2019 Final action: 12/3/2019
Title: Action on an Agreement with HSQ Technology for the Upgrade of an Existing MISER Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Core System
Attachments: 1. HSQ Quotation
REPORT TO COUNCIL
SUBJECT
Title
Action on an Agreement with HSQ Technology for the Upgrade of an Existing MISER Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Core System

Report
BACKGROUND
The City's potable water distribution system infrastructure is comprised of approximately 335 miles of water mains, 27 wells, seven above ground potable water storage tanks with more than 28 million gallons of water storage capacity, three water import connections, nine emergency standby connections to external water systems, and four booster pump stations. The City's sewer collection system consists of more than 288 miles of sewer main with two pump stations and five lift stations controlling flow to the San Jos?-Santa Clara Regional Wastewater Facility (RWF). The City's storm drain system has 22 pump lift stations.
The department uses HSQ Technology's Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system to monitor and control the City's water, sewer, and storm drain infrastructure described above. The SCADA system is utilized by both the Water and Sewer Utilities Department and the Public Works Department's Storm Division ("Storm"). SCADA data is stored in a proprietary HSQ database and mirrored to a relational database on the City's business network. The SCADA system monitors water, sewer, and storm stations and can control a small number of water components.
The system was originally installed in the early 1990's. Servers, computers, hardware, software, and components throughout the system are aged, obsolete and beyond their useful life. Most of the work on the system is repairing and/or replacing components with similar or hard to find parts, on an as-needed or an emergency basis. Some servers and workstations were upgraded in 2000 to keep up with repairs and updates. However, many of the circuit boards in the control panels at the remote sites are over 20 years old and in need of upgrades. The core system consists of two legacy Servers, two legacy Work St...

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